Belize Top Honeymoon Destination for 2013

Posted on Monday, December 30th, 2013


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Belize just got ranked among Google’s most searched honeymoon spots over the past year.

“This info is gold if you want to really know what the local hotspots are,” said Google spokesperson Joyce Hau. Beauty by Belize and Luxury by Design, Chabil Mar, the guest exclusive resort of Placencia, Belize, is the ultimate escape for love birds in Belize.
phoca thumb m olivera rusu photography dolphin pool drinks with umbrellasphoca thumb m out of the sea chabil mar belize resortphoca thumb m olivera rusu at chabil mar belize resort honeymoon golf cart exit

Chabil Mar delights couples in love with their unique honeymoon vacation packages that feature snorkeling in the largest barrier reef in the western hemisphere, guided nature tour of Monkey River, excursions to ancient Maya temple sites, beach combing in Belize’s  most exquisite beaches and much, much more. Previous honeymooners who vacationed at Chabil Mar in Placencia, Belize had this to say: “We spent the second half of our Belize honeymoon at Chabil Mar. It was absolutely wonderful… The service during our entire stay  was exceptional. We had our last meal on the dock which was absolutely beautiful, and the lobster was delicious. Our breakfasts every morning were delicious. Most nights we borrowed the bikes and rode into town for dinner.”

So whether you are getting married, renewing your vows or going on your honeymoon, Belize is the perfect place to do it. View your all-inclusive options or build your own adventure honeymoon in Belize, by contacting us at Chabil Mar.

Click here for Virtual Tour of Chabil Mar and their Honeymoon Suite. Multiple accommodation options available for your special time together.

Contact us to make your inquiry and/or Reservation today.

5 Reasons to Visit Belize Now

Posted on Monday, December 30th, 2013

Blue Hole Chabil Mar Belize Resort Elizabeth Monkey River Welcome 650 Sign Chabil Mar Belize Resort

glorious scenery 07 160 Heyer Chaa Creek Bamboo Trail Chabil Mar Belize Resort  Howler Monkey Chabil Mar Belize Resort 160 Heyer Kayaking Chabil Mar Belize Resort

Fodor’s – the largest publisher of English Language travel and tourism information in the world published last week on their website 5 top reasons why travelers should visit Belize. The article was written by Fodor’s Guest Blogger Brian Major who insists to travel to Belize as soon as possible before the crowds arrive.

Beach bumming is one of the top five reasons to visit Belize! “Just off of Belize’s Caribbean coast is an archipelago of sunny islands (known as cayes), featuring myriad natural wonders and a series of charming beach towns, all easily reached via the well-run local carrier, Tropic Air. Placencia (in southern Belize) has few docks or developments, allowing for miles of uninterrupted beach, and just a few cozy boutique hotels”, writes Brian.

For the adventure seekers, the Fodor’s Guest Blogger recommends cave exploration and river tubing at Caves Branch in Cayo where they can rappel into caverns and float along an underground river on inner tubes. He also urges adventure travelers to check out Shipstern Wildlife Reserve in Corozal, Antelope Falls in Mayflower Bacawina National Park and Cerros Caye in Corozal Bay for panoramic views of the Caribbean.

And yes diving is one of the reasons to visit Belize! We all know that Belize has the second largest barrier reef on the planet and offers world class diving. “The Hol Chan Marine Reserve off San Pedro features more than 160 species of fish and nearly 40 types of coral, plus nurse sharks and stingrays. Try the South Water Caye Marine Reserve, accessible from Dangriga, or hit up the Splash Dive Center in Placencia, for whale shark diving excursions near Gladden Spit, plus day and overnight trips to the Great Blue Hole submarine sinkhole, ranked among the world’s 10 best dive sites by Jacques Cousteau” writes Brian.

To read the other two reasons, please click here http://www.fodors.com/news/5-reasons-to-visit-belize-now-7369.html

To learn more about Belize adventure vacations from Placencia and Chabil Mar – Contact Us – Click Here
OR – Call Toll Free US/CAN: 1-866-417-2377 – Local: 011-501-523-3606

6 Things to Know about the Garifuna people of Belize

Posted on Friday, December 27th, 2013

garifuna flag Chabil Mar Resort Belize Garifuna Settlement Day Drummer Garifuna Settlement Day Banner

Every year on November 19, Garifuna Settlement day is observed which marks the arrival  of the Garifuna people in Belizean territory in 1802. The holiday was created by Thomas  Vincent Ramos, a Belizean civil rights activist and is celebrated for a whole week with  major festivities that include parades, live music, drumming, dancing, prayers and pageantry in Garifuna communities. Here are 6 things to know about the Garifuna people of Belize:

1.) In 2001, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) recognized the Garifuna language, music and dance as a masterpiece of the oral and intangible heritage of humanity. This designation means that it is a important culture that should be preserved, promoted and celebrated.

2.) According to Historians, the Garifuna resisted British and French colonialism in the Lesser Antilles and were defeated by the British in 1796. Because of a violent rebellion on St Vincent, the British moved 5000 Garifuna across the Caribbean to the Bay Islands off the north of Honduras. From there, they migrated to the Caribbean coasts of Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala and Belize. By 1802 about 150 Garifuna had settled in Stann Creek (present day Dangriga) area and were engaged in fishing and farming.

3.) The Garifuna are resilient people who have survived many years of extreme hardships and are the only black people in the Americas to have preserved their native Afro-Caribbean culture due to the fact that their ancestors were never slaves. The Garifuna’s deep sense of kinship and participation in community cultural activities have provide them with a sense of solidarity and cultural identity during times of turmoil.

4.) The religion of the Garifuna consists of a mix of Catholicism, African and Indian beliefs. They believe that the departed ancestors mediate between the individual and external world and if a person behaves and performs well, then he will have good fortune. If not, then the harmony that exists in relationships with others and the  external world will be disrupted leading to misfortune and illness.  Their spiritualism is expressed through music, dancing and other art forms.

5.) The Garifuna foods consist of fish, chicken, cassava, bananas and plantains. One of the staples of the diet is cassava. Cassava is made into bread, a drink, a pudding and even a wine! The cassava bread is served with most meals. The process of making the bread is very labor intensive and takes several days. Hudut is a very common traditional meal. Hudut consists of fish cooked in a coconut broth (called sere) and served with mashed plantains or yams. Dharasa is the Garifuna version of a tamale made with green bananas. It can be made either sweet or sour. The foods are very labor intensive and used to be cooked over an open fire hearth. Today, stoves save time, but some families still prefer the taste of the fire hearth.

6.) The Garifuna flag consists of three horizontal strips of black, white and yellow, in that order, starting from the top. The flag has been accepted internationally as the flag of the Garifuna Nation and the colors have been used in forums where Garifuna people assert their Garifuna identity. Discover the culture of Belize.

Contact Us to “Reserve your custom Belize vacation package.”

Where is Placencia, Belize?

Posted on Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

What’s it like in Placencia? Where is the Peninsula? Where is the Village located?

Placencia Village Aerial and Chabil Mar Belize Resort

Living in Placencia, Belize: Paradise Found

FROM SUZAN HASKINS AND DAN PRESCHER and International living – Excerpts

Just where is Placencia? It’s about a three-and-a-half hour drive south of Belize City. Placencia town lies at the tip of a 16-mile long narrow  strip of land known as the Placencia Peninsula. The peninsula, only a half-mile wide at its widest point, offers Caribbean beachfront to the  east and a protected lagoon on the western side where manatees are often seen.  Everything here is close to the water, and all along the paradisiacal peninsula on either side you’ll find restaurants, hotels and small resorts, individual homes, and all those new residential communities. Here are some fast facts about the Placencia Peninsula. There are basically three villages on the peninsula: tiny Maya Beach (more an “area” than a town), the Garifuna settlement of Seine Bight, and Placencia town. Only a few thousand people live on the peninsula, centered around these three small villages, the largest of which is Placencia town with about 1,000 residents.

On a fun note, that road we talked about earlier… it dead ends at the southern tip of the peninsula in Placencia town, which itself offers another north/south transportation artery — the Placencia Sidewalk. It’s 4,071 feet long and 4 feet wide, and according to the Guinness Book of World Records, it’s the narrowest main street in the world. Read the entire article here!

The Ancient Maya of Belize

Posted on Monday, December 16th, 2013

web image xunantunich

The Ancient Maya Of Belize
By: Jaime J. Awe Ph.D.
Copyright: First Edition December, 2005
(Following are excerpts taken from the above publication and do not constitute the book in its entirety)

What Mayan language was spoken in Belize before the arrival of the Spanish? Epigraphers and historical linguists believe that two major languages were spoken in Belize during the Classic period (A.D. 300-900) of Maya civilization. Yucatec was spoken in the northern two thirds of the country, and Cholan was the common language of the people who lived in the south. Cholan speakers are now only found in Guatemala and in the state of Chiapas in Mexico.

What Mayan languages are spoken in Belize today?
Today Yucatec is still spoken by the Maya who live in the villages of San Antonio and Succotz in the Cayo District, and by people in the Corozal and Orange Walk Districts. Mopan, which is spoken in San Antonio Village in the Toledo District, is a dialect of Yucatec. Other Maya communities in the Toledo District are Kekchi speakers. Kekchi originated in the Alta Verapaz region of Guatemala.

When was Maya civilization fully established?
In the past scholars believe that Maya civilization was not fully established until about A.D. 300, at the start of the Early Classic Period. Recent research, however, has provided conclusive evidence that ancient Maya civilization was actually in full bloom by at least 100 B.C. in the late Pre-classic period. By this early date the Maya were already carving stelae on altars, conducting long distance trade, utilizing mathematical and calendrical systems, and constructing monumental architecture.

How did the Maya perceive their universe?
They perceived their world as having three levels: the heavens, earth and underworld. The heavens were subdivided into thirteen levels and the underworld into nine levels. At the center of the universe was the sacred Ceiba tree whose limbs touched the heavens and roots descended into the underworld. Heaven was the adobe of sacred gods and deified ancestors. Earth was the home of humans, the forests, and all other creatures. The underworld was a place of death and diseases, and home of the Bolontiku (nine evil gods).

For more information on the Maya of Belize, visit http://www.chabilmarvillas.com/images/pdf/TheAncientMayaHistoryandCulture.pdf

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